In Her Element is a new photo-series by Delegate featuring inspiring women in Singapore who excel in their various domains. We visited Celeste, Founder of Bite Me Productions and Director of Marketing at The Great Room at Tablescape in Grand Park City Hall.

Celeste’s resume reads equal parts impressive and diverse.

She is the Founder of Bite Me Productions, a newly-launched company that creates pop-up immersive dining, show and party experiences and also doubles up as the Director of Marketing for The Great Room, one of Singapore’s leading names in co-working.

Bite Me Productions is not Celeste’s first venture, having founded the iconic The Butter Factory nightclub as well as produced films and more.


From nightlife to co-working and now pop-up theatre, Celeste acknowledges that even though these may seem like such different industries, her willingness to stomach uncertainty has been pivotal in contributing to the success of her pursuits.

” Starting projects is the easy part. But as long as you’re willing to jump in, you’ll do everything in your power to come up with the right solutions later.” she says modestly.

The first production by Bite Me “Diva to the Death” is a prime example of her ability to tolerate unpredictability. Each show involves a degree of live audience participation and interaction.


Writing plays to suit a restaurant or bar, Celeste shares candidly, is a logistical nightmare.

It is very different from renting a stage or theatre as restaurants are not equipped for shows. An example she cites is in acoustics. Sound travels well when a restaurant is empty, but fill it with an audience of fifty and nothing can be heard.

Despite these challenges, Celeste shrugs, “I would have started Bite Me even if I had known it was so hard anyway. I just couldn’t take my mind off the project. I needed to see it take off.”


Celeste confesses that her secret sauce is the people that she works with.

She attributes much of her success to having assembled a great team and with working with the right partners, including her business partners and colleagues who allow her to focus on what she does best.

She admits to being motivated by very different things now compared to when she first started The Butter Factory when she wanted to do everything herself.

As she’s grown in her career, she’s learnt to prioritise what’s important and to be more careful with her time. Quality of life for her currently trumps career and creative goals. Wearing two hats the past year required quite a substantial sacrifice of her time with her loved ones. Now, she says, she prefers a slower pace of life so “it’s important to have many motivations and goals.”

Her last word for budding entrepreneurs?

“Do what you can relate to, do what you love.”